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bored cat

What happens if you make a mistake with bored and boring? 

Both words are adjective forms of the base form bore, but that’s where the similarity ends.

 

 

 

To score highly on speaking tests like the G.B.C., you need to show the best of your English—make long but well-organized sentences, add detail, and show you have a wide vocabulary. One easy way to do that is to use comparatives. 

E-mail is an ever-changing form of communication. The rules you learnt a few years ago may already be outdated. Follow this guide to ensure you send the right message between the lines.

In the G.B.C. exam, using advanced grammar and sophisticated logic will improve your score significantly. In this post, you'll learn a really simple trick using the relation between two tenses. With it, you can create longer and more complex answers.

Keep doing homework!

Students at the English Farm write some amazing G.B.C. answers. So, we are going to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure, and word choice are the student's.

All person-administered tests are vulnerable to examiner bias, but don't worry—if you are likable, then it can work in your favor. One study showed that even with a rigorous, standardised

Students at The English Farm write some amazing G.B.C. answers, so we are going to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure and word choice are the student's. 

A useful way to think about English in speaking tests is to divide your language into two types. One type is the actual information you want to give, the other type is the phrases that you use to introduce, support or link your information.

Students at The English Farm write some amazing GBC answers, so we are going to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure and word choice are the student's. 

In speaking tests like the G.B.C., you may get questions that you have never thought of before. You should say something intelligent, but you need time to think of what to say.

When we have a tight deadline, most of us can finish a lot of work quickly. But if the deadline is far away, that same work takes much longer. Why is that?

It's called Parkinson's law: "work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion."

Intonation is sometimes described as the music of language. Without it, our voices are flat and lifeless, but with it, even simple language can be funny, memorable or moving.

In the G.B.C. test, the examiner will almost certainly ask about your job. It’s a relatively easy subject because you don’t have to think of a long story or an abstract answer. You can just talk about what you know.

Sometimes the reason we say words wrong is because we don't know the right rules. Take, for example, these words:

It's often difficult for English language learners to know when to use any versus every. What's the difference? At first glance, sentences like "Anyone can try it" and "Everyone can try it" seem to mean the same thing.

Native English speakers tend to use strong language, so one step towards communicating naturally is to adopt a stronger style. 

In casual water-cooler chats, native speakers often use this pattern: "[Subject] is so [adj] that [full sentence]." 

This is a relatively simple G.B.C. question. It is often asked in the beginning of the test as a warm up, so take the opportunity to show off the best of your English.

I've got to tell it like it is: as much as you’d like to think you’re giving your clients valuesyou’re not.

Japanese people say "delicious" far more often than native English speakers do. In Japan, where I lived for about 6 years, I was surprised by how often I heard the word. When I spoke to other native English speakers, everyone seemed to feel the same way. Why is that? 

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