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Fresh on the blog

One essential part of speaking well is to break your speech into short chunks—usually a few words— and pausing briefly after each one. 

The word "can" is used in different ways in English—it can mean ability, possibility and permission. When native English speakers talk about what they can do, what do they mean?

Consider this: 

Students at the English Farm write some amazing G.B.C. answers, and we like to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure, and word choice are the student's.

In English, the subject of the sentence is not always the one who does the action. This can get a little confusing for non-native speakers.

Imagine your friend spots something different about you:

Students at the English Farm write some amazing G.B.C. answers, and we like to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure, and word choice are the student's.

Test season is stressful—after preparing for months, the last thing you want is for your performance to be limited by your nerves

Two Smilies sitting on a bench

The answer to “Do you mind if…” can be confusing for anyone, even native English speakers. Consider this situation:

As your English improves, you are able to make longer and longer sentences. But, should you? Consider this example: 

"Hanami" can be translated as "cherry blossom viewing", but if you simply say, "On Saturday, I did cherry blossom viewing," then a native speaker won't really understand you. They might wonder, "Did you view them from a bus? Was the goal to see as many trees as possible?" 

Many non-native English speakers find it difficult to add detail and expand. As a result, their speaking test scores are lower than they should be, and their writing lacks sophistication and impact.  

Students at the English Farm write some amazing G.B.C. answers, so we are going to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure, and word choice are the student's.

As spring comes, so does allergy season. Millions of people around the world suffer from pollen allergies, so let's look at the words and phrases you can use to describe how this allergy affects us. 

Native English speakers do drink alcohol, but rarely say "go drinking". Why? 

While it's grammatically correct to say, "have a drink", "have some beer", "go drinking", or "drink some alcohol", one of those is far better than the rest.

bored cat

What happens if you make a mistake with bored and boring? 

Both words are adjective forms of the base form bore, but that’s where the similarity ends.

To score highly on speaking tests like the G.B.C., you need to show the best of your English—make long but well-organized sentences, add detail, and show you have a wide vocabulary. One easy way to do that is to use comparatives. 

E-mail is an ever-changing form of communication. The rules you learnt a few years ago may already be outdated. Follow this guide to ensure you send the right message between the lines.

In the G.B.C. exam, using advanced grammar and sophisticated logic will improve your score significantly. In this post, you'll learn a really simple trick using the relation between two tenses. With it, you can create longer and more complex answers.

Keep doing homework!

Students at the English Farm write some amazing G.B.C. answers, so we are going to share the best of the best.

This piece has had minor corrections by a teacher, but the logic, structure, and word choice are the student's.

All person-administered tests are vulnerable to examiner bias, but don't worry—if you are likable, then it can work in your favor. One study showed that even with a rigorous, standardised

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