Orientation Express 2 Active learning: Pronunciation

The feet of two people walking together, wearing sneakers
Shadow your teacher often

Learn well by being active in class. You will understand and improve your pronunciation and fluency. You will also learn exercises you can do anytime, anywhere.

Introduction: 

Active learning is important. One way is shadowing. What is shadowing?

Warm Up: 

Discuss two reasons for shadowing.

Language: 

Shadowing helps you have smooth, fluent output. But, you need to shadow correctly. 

Below are two passages from the Clear Speech textbook.

Syllables

 

You can ask your teacher,

  • "How many syllables are in this word?"

Stress

You can ask your teacher,

  • "Where is the word stress?"

Connected speech

When you speak English fluently, words join together. 

In fact, sounds at the end of a word often move to the beginning of the next word.

You can ask your teacher,

  • "How does this phrase sound?"
Practice: 

A. Say these words naturally:

  1. comfortable 
  2. interesting
  3. Toronto
  4. New Orleans  

Say these phrases naturally:

  1. Could you say that again?
  2. Could you tell me what that word means?

B. Shadowing outside the lesson 

Read the following passage from Erin McKean's TED talk, "Go ahead, make up new words!" 

How would you say it? Where would you put the stress? 

I'm a lexicographer. I make dictionaries. And my job as a lexicographer is to try to put all the words possible into the dictionary. My job is not to decide what a word is; that is your job.  

Then watch the video and note which words she stresses. Do your best to shadow each chunk, one at a time.

 

 

Self-check

This lesson was about learning actively and speaking fluently. You looked at exercises from Clear Speech and Pronunciation In Use.

Are you able to speak with smooth, clear English? Briefly discuss how the courses above would meet your English needs.

Homework

  1. Use the TEFbot on your lesson record to shadow words and phrases. 
  2. Use Forvo.com to hear real people say individual words. (There are no phrases.)
  3. Find a TED talk, a podcast, a TV show or a YouTube channel you enjoy. Shadow a short clip; work your way up to longer segments.